Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle (Dalotia coriaria) Dalotia coriaria the Greenhouse Rove Beetle, both adults and larvae prey upon larvae of fungus gnats and adult beetles also target shore flies and thrips. The species was discovered feeding on a laboratory culture of fungus gnats, stimulating a study into its efficacy as a biological control agent.
Dalotia coriaria the Greenhouse Rove Beetle, both adults and larvae prey upon larvae of fungus gnats and adult beetles also target shore flies and thrips. The species was discovered feeding on a laboratory culture of fungus gnats, stimulating a study into its efficacy as a biological control agent. Dalotia (formerly Atheta) coriaria, also known as the rove beetle, is used for the control and management of shore flies (Scatella spp, Ephydridae spp), several species of sciarids (fungus gnats) such as Lycoriella spp, Sciara spp, Bradysia spp. and Mycetophilidae family members, thrips pupae (species like Frankliniella occidentalis also known as Western flower thrips), F. tritici a.k.a. flower thrips, and others which drop to the substrate to pupate, springtails (Collembola family members) and moth fly larvae (Psychodidae family). Life-style Dalotia coriaria is a 1/8th in., fast moving, soil-dwelling predatory beetle known for its aggressive feeding behavior. This beetle spends most of it’s time in the substrate but they can also fly. The eggs take 3-4 days to hatch into predacious larvae, which look somewhat similar to the adults. They pupate in silken chambers. Altogether they live for about 21 days at 70°F. They are effective at a wide range of temperatures of between 55-95°F. Benefits They have a wide range of dietary options at their disposal and can quickly react to differing pests without much of a problem. Due to their ability to colonize rapidly, react is an apt word. Their populations should mirror those of their prey after establishment. Being opportunistic, their numbers may stay fairly high in an area such as a greenhouse with a gravel floor or raised beds, or a garden with lots of organic matter. This is definitely a good thing as it may allow for more infrequent releases. Release Rates Use at a rate of 0.5 per sq. ft. Dose may be increased to 1 per sq. ft. to speed up establishment in areas of high infestation, particularly of shore flies.